Features

Creole Heritage Month Launched

img: The Eastern Folk Band’s jam sessions never disappoint in bringing the traditional beats to the people.
The Eastern Folk Band’s jam sessions never disappoint in bringing the traditional beats to the people.

THE grounds of the Folk Research Centre (FRC) at Mount Pleasant could have easily been mistaken for an actual Jounen Kwéyòl venue at last Sunday’s official launch of Creole Heritage Month.

Creole Heritage Month (or Mwa Ewitaj Kwéyòl) is observed in October each year with several activities held across the island, including the La Marguerite flower festival, Jounen Kwéyòl Entonnasyonal (International Creole Day) on October 28, Lawenn Kwéyòl, and Jounen Kwéyòl.

This year, Creole Heritage Month will be observed under the theme, “Kité Kwéyòl Maché”, and as in previous years seek to foster increased awareness and appreciation of and for the island’s cultural heritage, language and traditions. Patrons also got the opportunity to tour the FRC’s museum where cultural items are displayed.

During Sunday’s official launch, some of the activities synonymous with a Jounen Kwéyòl event were present: food, music, arts and craft, bamboo bursting and wood cutting. Three of this year’s contestants for the Lawenn Kwéyòl Pageant also introduced themselves to the public.

Meanwhile, preparations are progressing in earnest in anticipation of this year’s Jounen Kwéyòl (Creole Day) scheduled for Sunday, October 30 in four host communities: Gros Islet, Choiseul, Jacmel and Belle Vue (Vieux Fort).

First held in Mon Repos in 1984, this year marks the 32nd anniversary of the hosting of Jounen Kwéyòl. Due to the passage of Hurricane Tomas in 2010, the event was cancelled.

img: This craftswoman puts on a great showing with her madras outfits. [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]
This craftswoman puts on a great showing with her madras outfits. [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]
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img: These craftsmen from Mongouge, Choiseul demonstrate how they transform locally-grown wood into exquisite furniture using a traditional lathe. [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]
These craftsmen from Mongouge, Choiseul demonstrate how they transform locally-grown wood into exquisite furniture using a traditional lathe. [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]
img: Kwéyòl brooches, anyone? [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]
Kwéyòl brooches, anyone? [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]
img: (From left to right) Angela Simon (Jacmel), Loraine Agatha Verdant-Danzie (Gros Islet) and Lucita Ferdinand (Castries) are three of the six hopefuls vying for this year’s Lawenn Kwéyòl title. [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]
(From left to right) Angela Simon (Jacmel), Loraine Agatha Verdant-Danzie (Gros Islet) and Lucita Ferdinand (Castries) are three of the six hopefuls vying for this year’s Lawenn Kwéyòl title. [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]

img: Handcrafted jewellery and purses to set the trend for the upcoming season.
Handcrafted jewellery and purses to set the trend for the upcoming season.

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img: What’s a Jounen Kwéyòl event without some wholesome food to sample on? [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]
What’s a Jounen Kwéyòl event without some wholesome food to sample on? [PHOTO: Stan Bishop]
Stan Bishop began his career in journalism in March 2008 writing freelance for The VOICE newspaper for six weeks before being hired as a part-time journalist there when one of the company’s journalists was overseas on assignment.

Although he was initially told that the job would last only two weeks, he was able to demonstrate such high quality work that the company offered him a permanent job before that fortnight was over. Read full bio...

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